The Cycles of Beauty

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Remember that 30 Rock episode where Liz Lemon’s boyfriend, Dennis, reminded her that “technology is cyclical?” While bringing back Motorola’s is obviously a terrifying prospect, there’s definitely “cycles” in beauty and fashion. Consider that weird 60s revival we had in the early 2000s or the 90s influences that are starting to trickle in now. To some degree, we all ride the waves of fashion and beauty trends.

Even plastic surgery isn’t immune. As this article in New Beauty points out, we’re in the midst of something of a sea change in the field. As celebrities and the general public gradually become more open about having plastic surgery, the aesthetic trends guiding surgeons around the world are changing, too. A new emphasis on creating natural-looking results via improving proportions and embracing the individual is here, and it’s making a lot of people reconsider their long-held opinions about plastic surgery.

Let’s start with the matter of efficiency. Plastic surgery is no longer associated with long recovery periods, hyper-bandaged heads, and tight, unnatural contours. Aesthetics are big business, and new techniques and technologies are emerging quickly to meet the demands of savvy consumers. More refined surgical techniques reduce the need for a long recovery time. According to the website of Northbrook, IL plastic surgeon Dr. Mark Sisco, breast augmentation patients can count on being back in the office after only a few days.

Closeup of a smiling model wearing a large ring. Most focus is on hand.

 

Injectable fillers are another good example of the rise in efficiency. In the past, patients who had injectable treatments could count on results that lasted for a few months or so. But just this year, the FDA approved a new filler from Allergan (maker of BOTOX® and JUVÉDERM®) with results that are purported to last up to 18 months. We’re always looking for ways to do things better, faster, and with less effort, and beauty is certainly no exception.

The “look” is different too, which is most exciting to me. Today, we can look back on the trend of overly made-up, uniform faces — the models in the Addicted to Love music video are probably the best example of this trend — and laugh from a distance. Today the emphasis is on the individual, celebrating diversity in ethnicity, gender, and identity at every turn. In the makeup world, the focus is on fun and experimentation, while plastic surgeons report a demand for “natural-looking” teardrop-shaped breast implants in conservative sizes.

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This all makes me wonder who’s guiding these changes -is it us or them? Do marketers, developers, and researchers answer our call, or do we build our tastes based on what’s given to us? I want to hear what you think about this topic, and I want to know what you think the next beauty trend will be. Will there be a backlash to our present worship of natural individuality? Or have we turned a completely new corner, never to return to our old ways?

This post was written by health and beauty author, Emmy Owens.

 

 

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